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  • Wyoming Barley Production: Opportunities to Manage Production, Quality and Revenue Risks
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service, April 2017.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Barley is an important crop in Wyoming that may be raised as animal feed or for malting. Different varieties are typically used for feed barley and malt barley and malting barley yields are generally lower than feed barley yields. Some farmers may choose to raise organic barley to serve the needs of niche markets. Insurance products offered by the USDA Risk Management Agency are available for feed barley, malting barley (through a malting barley endorsement), and organic barley. These products are the focus of this briefing paper.
  • Risk Scenairo Planning Course: Evaluating Risk and Risk Management Strategies from RightRiskTM
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension; Jay Parsons, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and William Taylor, University of Wyoming Extension, emeritus; September 2016.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: Introduction to Risk, Risk Strategies, Case Studies: Gates Creek Land & Livestock, Case Studies: Big Country Farms, Case Studies: Bell Livestock, Case Studies: Z-F Ranch, Risk Scenairo Planning Tool Overview, Expectations About the Future, Risk Management Framework, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Risk Management for Specialty Crop and Specialty Livestock Operations through Farm Service Agency Programs and Risk Management Agency Products
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service, August 2016.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Two questions are central to understanding producer options for risk management and other government programs related to specialty crops and specialty livestock operations. First: what is a specialty crop? Second: what is a specialty livestock operation? This bulletin focuses on the management of production, price, and revenue risks for specialty crops and specialty livestock and the farms and ranches that have incorporated such enterprises into their overall enterprise mix.
  • Introduction to Managing Risk on Specialty and Organic Crop and Livestock Operations
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service, August 2016.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Increasingly, many farms are choosing to focus substantial amounts of their available resources, or even the whole farm or ranch, to specialty and organic crop and livestock enterprises. This bulletin examines the risks associated with specialty and organic farm enterprises and discusses in general terms the various private and federally supported risk management products and programs that can be used to address them.
  • Risk Management for Wyoming Crop and Livestock Commodities Produced Under Organic Practices through the Use of Risk Management Agency Products and Farm Service Agency Programs
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service, July 2016.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    USDA organic regulations describe organic agriculture as the application of a set of cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that support the recycling of on-farm resources, promote ecological balance and conserve biodiversity. The major focus of this bulletin is on crops and livestock, in the category of organic products for which USDA Risk Management Agency insurance products and USDA Farm Service Agency programs may be available to address production, price and revenue risks and losses from natural catastrophic disasters.
  • 2016 Western Extension Committee Ag Industry Survey
    John P. Hewlett, K. Fuller, S. Nakamoto, S. Neibergs, K. Painter, C. Seavert, D. Thilmany, H. Tejeda, J. Warner, S. Noray, and members of the Western Extension Committee who helped solicit input and circulate to clientele in the 13 western states, July, 2016.

    In early 2016, the idea for the Agricultural Industry Survey originated from a similar effort administered by a group of Colorado Extension Specialists. Members of the Western Extension Committees (WEC) on Farm Management and Marketing, made up of Extension economists from 13 Western States, Guam, and the U.S. Pacific Islands then initiated a survey specific to agriculture in the west. The survey invitation was emailed to the WEC membership who distributed it through Extension contact channels.
  • Managing Forage and Rangeland Production Risks on Wyoming Ranches: NAP, LFP, and PRF-VI
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service, July 2015.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Wyoming ranch managers are increasingly seeking production risk management tools for harvested forage production and grass production on rangeland. Forage production and rangeland production risks can be addressed to some degree by using the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) provided by the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).
  • Management Succession: How Do We Get There From Here? from RightRiskTM
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and William Taylor, University of Wyoming Extension, emeritus; June 2015.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: Journey to Management Succession, Beyond Goals for Change, and Where Do We Go From Here? Also included are a 120-page Management Succession Workbook, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Supplementary Insurance Coverage Option: A New Risk Management Tool for Wyoming Producers, The
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  April 2015.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Through the provisions of the 2014 Agricultural Act that became law on February 17, 2014, Wyoming farmers have new farm income safety net-related policy tools that can be used to improve the financial performance of their operations. However, the new set of policy tools requires farmers to make choices among competing alternatives. In the case of a new crop-specific insurance policy called the Supplementary Insurance Coverage Option (SCO), farmers must decide whether they should sign up for that policy and, at the same time, whether they should adjust the coverage levels they obtain through their current crop insurance policies.
  • Management Succession: Where Do We Want to Go? from RightRiskTM
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, Rodney L. Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, August 2014.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: An introduction to Management Succession, Three (3) In-depth Family Case Studies, The Succession Planning Process, and Where Do We Go From Here? Also included are course resources, Best Succession Management Practices (BSMP) Lists, worksheets, and many other features.
  • New Programs in the 2014 Farm Bill: Price Loss Coverage, Agricultural Risk Coverage and the Supplemental Coverage Agricultural Insurance Option for Wyoming Farms and Ranches
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2014.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    The Agricultural Act of 2014 was signed into law on February 17, 2014 by President Obama. The Act, widely referred to as the 2014 Farm Bill, introduces major changes in many U.S. farm programs that are important for farm and ranch owners and managers in Wyoming. Under the provisions of the 2014 Farm Bill, several long standing programs related to farmers’ and ranchers’ risk management decisions that have been widely used by Wyoming agricultural producers were terminated or are being phased out while several new programs have been introduced.
  • Production Risk Management for Wyoming Ranches: The Supplemental Federal Agricultural Disaster Programs
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2014.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Wyoming ranchers are involved in risky enterprises and use a wide range of tools to manage risk and reduce the chances that they will suffer financial losses. The Agricultural Act of 2014, passed February 7, 2014, makes the Livestock Forage Disaster Program, Livestock Indemnity Payments, and Emergency Assistance of Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish permanent and provides for retroactive authority to cover eligible losses back to October 1, 2011.
  • Production Risk Management for Wyoming Ranches: The Future for Federal Disaster Programs
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2013.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Wyoming ranchers know they are involved in risky enterprises and use a wide range of tools to manage risk and reduce the chances that they will suffer financial losses. Changes in the future operation of, and funding levels for some of these permanent disaster programs are under consideration in Congress as efforts to formulate a new 2013 farm bill move forward.
  • Crop Subsidy and Crop Insurance for Wyoming Farmers in a New 2013/14 Farm Bill
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2013.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Farm policy is in flux and the future of many farm subsidy programs is in question. Nevertheless, it is useful for all farm and ranch managers to understand the structure of the types of new crop subsidy programs included the 2013 farm bills proposed by the House and Senate Agricultural Committees and how those programs may be linked to, and influence a farm’s participation in the federal crop insurance program.
  • Management Succession: Where Are We? from RightRiskTM
    Rodney L. Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, July 2013.

    A two-hour CD and A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: An introduction to Management Succession, Interpersonal Issues, Business Issues, The Succession Planning Process, and Where Do We Go From Here? Also included are a glossary, FAQ list, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Getting On Track: Understanding Financial Performance course"http://RightRisk.org"> RightRiskTM
    Rodney L. Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, October 2012.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course including: what is financial analysis?, measures of liquidity, measures of solvency, measures of profitability, measures of financial efficiency, measures of repayment capacity, and where do I go from here? A glossary, frequently asked questions, and resource links are provided, along with example records systems and much more.
  • Risk Management Options Using the Common Crop (Combo) Policy in Wyoming: An Irrigated Farm Example
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  August 2012.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    RMA released the Common Crop Insurance Policy Basic Provisions and related Crop Provisions as the insurance policy basis for crop insurance coverage. This bulletin illustrates the use of the COMBO Policy in the context of a representative Wyoming farm that grows crops on irrigated land.
  • The Common Crop (COMBO) Policy
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2012.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Beginning with the 2011 crop year, the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Risk Management Agency (RMA) introduced an initiative to combine and simplify crop insurance. RMA released the Common Crop Insurance Policy Basic Provisions and related Crop Provisions as the insurance policy basis for crop insurance coverage. The new policy is widely described as the COMBO Policy because it explicitly combines APH revenue and APH yield insurance in one general policy and creates a single APH revenue program for each of the commodities that are eligible for APH-based revenue coverage.
  • Getting on Track: Better Management Through Basic Financial Statements from RightRiskTM
    Rodney L. Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, October 2011.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: An introduction to Financial Statements, Cash Flow Statements, Balance Sheets, Income Statements, Statement of Owner Equity, and Where Do I Go From Here?. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Production Risk Management Options for Wyoming Ranches: Crop Insurance and Federal Disaster Programs
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  August, 2011
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Ranchers know they are involved in risky enterprises and use a wide range of tools to manage risk and reduce the chances that they will suffer financial losses. Increasingly, federal insurance for agricultural commodities offered by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation has become an important and attractive risk management tool for ranchers. This paper provides detailed descriptions of three disaster programs authorized under the 2008 Farm Bill that apply directly to ranch operations, as well as Federally-subsidized crop insurance available from private insurance companies agents.
  • Risk Management Programs for Honey Bee Producers in Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  May, 2011
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Two major United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs are designed to provide risk management tools for managers of honey bee colonies and the production of honey. Each of these two programs is described and illustrations are provided of how they may be of assistance to Wyoming honey bee producers.
  • Livestock Risk Protection for Lamb in Utah
    John P. Hewlett* and James B. Johnson Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November 2010.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Federally-subsidized yield and/or revenue insurance products for crops are offered in many counties in Utah. Historically, federally-subsidized offerings of livestock-related risk management products have been limited to crops produced for livestock feed and, for a short time, a dairy options pilot program. In September 2006 the Risk Management Agency (RMA) approved a price risk management product for lamb. This insurance product will be available for purchase in every Utah county . . .
  • Rural Tax Education
    Ruby Ward, Extension Economist and Associate Professor Utah State University; Joseph A. Bennett, Senior Extension Associate Cornell University; Leon Geyer, Professor Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Philip Harris, Agricultural Law Specialist University of Wisconsin-Madison; JC Hobbs, Assistant Extension Specialist Oklahoma State University; Guido van der Hoeven, Extension Specialist/Sr Lecturer North Carolina State University; Gary Hoff, Extension Specialist-Taxation University of Illinois; Dennis Kauppila, Regional Specialist: Farm Business Management University of Vermont; Keith Kightlinger, Extension Economist- Farm Financial Management University of Georgia; Warren Lee, Professor Emeritus The Ohio State University; Roger McEowen, Associate Professor Iowa State University; George Patrick, Professor and Extension Economist Purdue University; Jerry Pierce, KFBM Program Coordinator University of Kentucky; Glenn Rogers, Professor Emeritus University of Vermont; and Jeffrey Tranel, Agricultural & Business Mgmt Economist Colorado State University, October 2010.
    Rural Tax Education provides farmers and ranchers, other agricultural producers and Extension educators with a source for agriculturally related income and self-employment tax information that is both current and easy to understand.
  • Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF) Pilot Insurance Program: Rainfall and Vegetation Index Plans from RightRiskTM
    Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, August 2010.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: An introduction to PRF, Using the Grid Locator, Rainfall Index, Scenario 1 - The Timmerman Family Farm, LLC, Scenario 2 - Adam's Hay, Vegetation Index, Scenario 3 - Double R Ranch, and Calculating Premiums. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Profiling the Evolving Characteristics and Needs for Risk Management Education of Commercial Agricultural Producers in the Intermountain West from Rural Family Ventures
    A survey of demographics, threats, educational preferences, and resources managed by agricultural producers reporting annual sales greater than $50,000 across Wyoming, Colorado, and Arizona

    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Cole Ehmke,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Tauhidur Rahman,  University of Arizona, Trent Teegerstrom,  University of Arizona, Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, Randolph Weigel,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, August 2010.
    There are 63,760 farmers and ranchers in the states of Wyoming, Colorado, and Arizona. Significant changes in the number of farms have occurred from 1997 to 2002 to 2007. Farms reporting more than 180 acres account for only 35 percent of all farms (down from 45 percent). Likewise, farms with sales of greater than $50,000 account for only 18 percent of all farms across the three states. (NASS 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007)  This project seeks to better -understand Extension clientele and provide researchers with greater insight into clientele demographics, education methodology preferences, and perceived risks.  More information available at: RuralFamilyVentures.org
  • Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE): Wyoming
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February, 2010
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    The new Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE), created by 2008 Farm Bill, is a permanent disaster aid program for farms producing crops. The program is one of five different permanent disaster programs authorized by the act. The purpose of the SURE program is to provide agricultural producers with automatic disaster payments when the region in which they farm experiences catastrophic natural weather events or when an individual farm experiences severe crop losses due to highly localized adverse weather conditions.
  • Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP): Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, John P. Hewlett*, and Vincent H. Smith, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February, 2010
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    The Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who have suffered grazing losses because of qualifying drought or fire. The eligible grazing losses must occur within the same calendar year the benefits are being requested. Compensation provided under LFP can be used for any purpose by the program participant.
  • Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP): Wyoming
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson, and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  January, 2010
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    The Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP) provides emergency assistance to eligible producers of livestock, honeybees, and farm-raised fish who have losses due to disease, adverse weather, or other conditions, including losses due to blizzards, or wildfire, as determined by the Secretary of Agriculture.
  • Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP): Montana
    James B. Johnson & Vincent H. Smith, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  January, 2010.
    The Livestock Indemnity Program provides payments to eligible livestock owners and contract growers for livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather. LIP does not have a risk management purchase requirement for program benefit eligibility.
  • Agricultural Risk Management: The Case of Wildlife Risks
    Benjamin S. Rashford, Jared M. Grant and John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming, November
    2009
    When agriculture, wildlife, and risk are mentioned in the same sentence, thoughts often turn to risks agricultural production imposes on wildlife (e.g., habitat degradation and pesticide exposure). The imposition of risk can, however, work in the other direction as well. Wildlife populations on agricultural land create a unique set of risks for producers, few of which are considered in traditional risk management discussions.
  • Getting On Track: Better Management Through Basic Ag Records course from RightRiskTM
    Trent Teegerstrom, University of Arizona, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, Rodney L. Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, July 2009.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course including four vignettes titled: Preserving The Tradition, Putting All Your Eggs in One Basket Get the Max From Your Tax, and 4-H Gone Hog Wild. Other topics covered include: why keep records?, basic record keeping 5 easy steps, keeping production records, keeping financial records, schedule F, where do I go from here? A glossary, frequently asked questions, and resource links are provided, along with example records systems and much more.
  • AG IN UNCERTAIN TIMES: helping producers and others meet the challenge…
    Duane Griffith, John P. Hewlett, Ramiro Lobo, Trent Teegerstrom, Jeffrey Tranel, John Nelson, and Jon Newkirk representing the Cooperative Extension Service in Montana, Wyoming, California, Arizona, Colorado and Washington,  June 2009.

    Ag In Uncertain Times web pages are designed to provide current information to farmers, ranchers and educators about the challenges in today’s agricultural economy. The webinars and tools found there are some of the best currently available. Included are: 1) Schedule- a listing of live webinars open to the general public on a variety of topics. 2) Speakers- a listing of speakers presenting in our webinars and 3) Webinars- access to recordings of live events listed on the Schedule. These pages also offer the opportunity to engage others in discussion about the topics covered.
  • Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Vegetation Index Insurance: A New Group Risk Plan Available in Wyoming
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  June 2009.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Vegetation Index Insurance product allows producers to cover losses of grazingland production, hayland production, or both. The PRF Vegetation Index insurance product allows producers to obtain indemnities when widespread reductions in pasture or forages occur in a designated area called a grid, a 4.8-mile by 4.8-mile area where forage is located.
  • Risk Management Options for Wyoming Farms
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  May 2009.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Ranchers and farmers know they are involved in financially risky enterprises and, as a result, develop strategies and tools to manage that risk. Typically, those strategies involve the use of multiple production, price and business risk management tools. This paper describes federally subsidized production and revenue insurance products available to Wyoming farming operations and presents simulations of the effects of alternative risk management strategies for a representative Wyoming farm. A farm that represents operations in Big Horn and Washakie counties is used to evaluate alternative production and revenue risk management strategies that involve Risk Management Agency (RMA) insurance products.
  • Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Rainfall Index Insurance: A New Group Risk Plan Available in Montana
    Vincent H. Smith, James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  April 2009.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    The Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) Rainfall Index Insurance product allows producers to obtain indemnities when rainfall is below average, resulting in widespread reductions in pasture or forage production in designated area called a grid. The Group Risk Plan (GRP) insurance product is primarily intended for use by producers whose forage production (feed for livestock comprised of plants grown for haying or grazing) is closely linked to rainfall, as measured by a rainfall index, for a grid.
  • Risk Management Options for Wyoming Ranchers
    James B. Johnson, Vincent H. Smith and John P. Hewlett*, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  January 2009.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Ranchers and farmers know they are involved in risky enterprises and use many tools to manage risk. This bulletin describes the crop, forage and livestock insurance products available to Wyoming ranch operations and presents simulations of the effects of alternative risk management strategies for representative large and small Wyoming ranches. These strategies involve different combinations of the following insurance products that are available in Wyoming: AGR-Lite, Actual Production History (APH), Crop Revenue Coverage (CRC), Group Risk Protection (GRP), Livestock Risk Protection (LRP), Livestock Gross Margin (LGM), and Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF).
  • “Battling Heat Stress in the 2008 Legal Context” in the AgSafe Newsletter
    “Battling Heat Stress in the 2008 Legal Context” in the Vine Lines Newsletter

    Howard Rosenberg, University of California at Berkeley,  August 2008.
    High temperatures and the rush of summer activities prompt many of us to think about problems that heat may bring. An early wave of hot weather and a few headline-making farm worker deaths already this year have intensified concerns about the most extreme hazards of heat to the human body...

  • AGR-Lite Traning Course from RightRiskTM
    Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, March 2008.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: Introduction to Risk Management, AGR-Lite Overview, Application Process, In the Event of a Loss, Documentation Considerations, and a Summary and Example in six lessons. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Irrigated Pasture Spreadsheet
    John A. Deering and D. Bruce Bosley, Colorado State University Extension, 2008
    This spreadsheet allows users to explore the costs and returns associated with grazing livestock on irrigated pasture at various stocking rates. The default values are for steers grazing in northeastern Colorado.
  • Insuring Success for Wyoming Agriculture 2008: Insurance & Risk Management Course
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, James B. Johnson, Montana State University Cooperative Extension, and Chris Bastian, University of Wyoming, Feb. 2008.

    A six-hour CD and internet-based course covering insurance products and risk management alternatives available to Wyoming agricultural producers. The course is divided into 12 lessons discussing the sources of risk, strategic management, insurance available for the major crops in Wyoming, other risk management practices, and a risk self-assessment. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features. This course contains updated information for 2008 with three sections of new material.
  • Adjusted Gross Revenue-Lite: A Whole Farm Revenue Insurance Available in Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, John P. Hewlett* and Duane Griffith Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February 2008.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Adjusted Gross Revenue-Lite (AGR-Lite) is a federally-subsidized whole-farm revenue protection insurance plan. The plan is a whole farm (ranch) revenue insurance that covers revenue losses from most farm-raised crop commodities, animal commodities, and unprocessed (unaltered) animal products such as milk and wool. The plan protects against low revenue due to losses in production and declines in product quality and market price.
  • Key Elements of An Estate Plan: An Overview
    Norman L. Dalsted and Rodney L. Sharp, Colorado State University, October 2007
    Estate planning is "information intensive."  If all the relevant data on a family's situation is not accurately assembled before work begins, there is a high risk that the initial plans and the documents drafted to carry out the plans won't be exactly right. . . .
  • A Lasting Legacy course #1 from RightRiskTM
    Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, July 2007.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering 1) Intergeneratational Relationships- Parent/Adult Child Relationships and Managing Intergenerational relationships, 2) Legacy Components- Values and Life Lessons and Personal Possessions of Emotional value in two modules and four lessons. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • A Lasting Legacy course #2 from RightRiskTM
    Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, July 2007.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering 1) Final Wishes and Instructions- End-of-Life Issues, Pre-Death Wishes, and Final Instructions, 2) Financial Assets and Real Estate- Estate Planning, Financial Planning, and Transferring Real Property across two modules and six lessons. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Resource Inventory course from Enterprising Rural Families: Making it WorkTM
    Randolph R. Weigel, John P. Hewlett, and William R. Taylor, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, July 2007.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering strategic management and goal setting for families in business across two modules and 5 lessons. Other materials include: twenty-two system inventories, eight readings to embellish course material, and thirteen interactive components and exercises to enhance participant learning. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Strategic Planning and Goal Setting course from Enterprising Rural Families: Making it WorkTM
    William R. Taylor, John P. Hewlett, and Randolph R. Weigel, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, July 2007.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering strategic management and goal setting for families in business across two modules and 9 lessons. Other materials include: scenarios of two example families in business to illustrate various aspects of the course content, four worksheets and assessments, seven readings to expand on course material, and twenty-two interactive components and exercises to enhance participant learning. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • “Safe-Harbor Procedures for Employers Who Receive a No-Match Letter” (This links to a non-library URL)
    Howard Rosenberg, University of California at Berkeley,  September 2007.
    Several bills that would affect the agricultural labor market and people within it have been introduced in Congress this year and are pending consideration. Meanwhile, a regulation published in the Federal Register on August 15, 2007, by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) branch of DHS has raised much concern, fear, and confusion in the agricultural community and in other industries with significant shares of unauthorized employees. ICE has presented the new rule as a guide to employers about their options in responding to receipt of either a "no-match" letter from the Social Security Administration (SSA) or a notice from DHS. . .

  • Heat Card
    Howard Rosenberg, University of California at Berkeley,  Spring 2007.
    A bilingual field education card (hard copy is folded accordion-style) that can be used in various ways, possibly in tailgate training sessions with supervisors and fieldworkers.

  • Heat 2007: Dealing with Old Risks and New Law
    Howard Rosenberg, University of California at Berkeley,  Summer 2007.
    As agricultural activity gets into full swing in most parts of the country, California growers and workers will be facing a familiar problem in a changed legal context. A permanent state regulation designed to reduce risks from excess heat in outdoor workplaces took effect mid-summer last year. While people in agriculture have long coped with heat in various ways, the new rule requires that employers. . .

  • Livestock Risk Protection for Lamb in Wyoming: A Preliminary Review
    James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett* Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  August 2007.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Federally-subsidized yield and/or revenue insurance products for crops are offered in many counties in Wyoming. Historically, federally-subsidized offerings of livestock-related risk management products have been limited to crops produced for livestock feed and, for a short time, a dairy options pilot program. In September 2006 the Risk Management Agency (RMA) approved a price risk management product for lamb. This insurance product will be available for purchase in every Wyoming county . . .
  • A New Look At the Agricultural Community As Extension Clientele in the West from Rural Family Ventures
    A survey of demographics, threats, educational preferences, and resources managed by agricultural producers in Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming having annual sales of less than $50,000

    Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Randolph Weigel,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Tauhidur Rahman,  University of Arizona, Trent Teegerstrom,  University of Arizona,  Cole Ehmke,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, April 2007.
    There are 48,085 farmers and ranchers in the states of Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming. Significant increases in the number of small farms have occurred from 1992 to 1997 to 2002. Farms reporting less than 180 acres account for almost 55 percent of all farms. Likewise, farms with sales of less than $50,000 account for fully 78 percent of all farms across the three states. (NASS 1992, 1997, 2002)  This project report seeks to identify Extension clientele and provide researchers with a greater understanding of clientele demographics, education methodology preferences, and perceived risks. More information available at: RuralFamilyVentures.org
  • Insuring Success for Wyoming Agriculture 2007: Insurance & Risk Management Course
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, James B. Johnson, Montana State University Cooperative Extension, and Chris Bastian, University of Wyoming, March 2007.

    A six-hour CD and internet-based course covering insurance products and risk management alternatives available to Wyoming agricultural producers. The course is divided into 12 lessons discussing the sources of risk, strategic management, insurance available for the major crops in Wyoming, other risk management practices, and a risk self-assessment. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features. This course contains updated information for 2007 with six sections of new material.
  • Guidelines for a Production Record Management System
    Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) with assistance from the Extension Service and crop insurance companies,  March 1995.
    The Federal Crop Insurance Act of 1980 established Actual Production History (APH) as a basis for yield guarantees. Enactment of the Federal Crop Insurance Reform Act of 1994 placed additional emphasis on yield guarantees based on APH. This booklet provides forms and guidance for developing and recording production records for each insured unit by production practice and type. . . . .
  • Nursery Crop Insurance in Wyoming
    James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett* Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  September 2006.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Multiple peril crop insurance for nursery production has been available since 1989 for nurseries that received at least 50 percent of their gross income from wholesale marketing of nursery plants. Multiple peril nursery crop insurance is available to wholesale nurseries in all Wyoming counties. Nursery crop insurance covers field grown and containerized nursery plants. . . .
  • Crop Insurance for Alfalfa Seed Production: A Pilot Program Available in Select Wyoming Counties
    James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett* Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2006.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    In several western states including Wyoming a federally-subsidized multiple peril crop insurance product approved by the Risk Management Agency is offered on a pilot basis for forage seed production. In Big Horn and Park counties irrigated alfalfa seed production grown under certification standards or grown under an alfalfa seed contract is insurable. Insurance is provided against the following. . . .
  • Group Risk Income Protection
    James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett* Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  July 2006.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Group Risk Income Protection (GRIP) is a federally-subsidized risk management tool to insure against widespread loss of revenue from an insured crop in a county. Crop producers whose yields are highly correlated with county yield are most likely to use this product to insure that the combination of yield and price results in a particular level of revenue. Unlike the related Risk Management Agency-approved. . . .
  • Taxes for Agricultural Enterprises course from RightRiskTM
    Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, Sept. 2006.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering 1) Definition of a Farm, 2) The Importance of Records, 3) Farm Income, 4) Farm Expenses, and 5) Tax Management. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Feasibility of Alternative Rural Enterprises course from RightRiskTM
    Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, Sept. 2006.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering 1) Agricultural and Rural Enterprises, 2) Selecting and Planning for Alternative Enterprise, and 3) Assessing Risks. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Insuring Success for Wyoming Agriculture 2006: Insurance & Risk Management Course
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, James B. Johnson, Montana State University Cooperative Extension, and Chris Bastian, University of Wyoming, May 2006.

    A six-hour CD and internet-based course covering insurance products and risk management alternatives available to Wyoming agricultural producers. The course is divided into 12 lessons discussing the sources of risk, strategic management, insurance available for the major crops in Wyoming, other risk management practices, and a risk self-assessment. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features. This course contains updated information for 2006.
  • Livestock Risk Protection for Swine in Wyoming
    James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett* Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  May 2006.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Federally-subsidized yield and/or revenue crop insurance products are offered in many counties in Wyoming. LRP-Swine is designed to insure against declining market prices for hogs. Specifically, a producer can insure against a decline in national hog prices below an established coverage price. . . .
  • Livestock Risk Protection for Fed Cattle in Wyoming
    James B. Johnson and John P. Hewlett* Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  May 2006.
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    Federally-subsidized yield and/or revenue crop insurance products are offered in many counties in Wyoming. LRP-Fed Cattle is designed to insure against declining market prices for fed cattle. Specifically, the producer is insured against a decline in national fed cattle prices below an established coverage price. . . .
  • GRP Rangeland Insurance For Montana
    Gary Brester, John P. Hewlett*, and James B. Johnson,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November 2005 (revised)
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    A new Group Risk Plan (GRP) Rangeland Insurance product is being offered by USDA's Risk Management Agency (RMA) in 39 Montana counties. For counties in which this insurance product is not offered, USDA's Farm Service Agency continues to offer the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. . . .
  • GRP Rangeland Insurance For Wyoming
    John P. Hewlett*, Gary Brester, and James B. Johnson,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November 2005 (revised)
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    A new Group Risk Plan (GRP) Rangeland Insurance product is being offered by USDA's Risk Management Agency (RMA) in 10 Wyoming counties. For counties in which this insurance product is not offered, USDA's Farm Service Agency continues to offer the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. . . .
  • Rangeland Production Risk Management in Montana
    Gary Brester, John P. Hewlett*, and James B. Johnson,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  September 2005
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    A new Group Risk Plan (GRP) Rangeland Insurance product is being offered by USDA's Risk Management Agency (RMA) in 39 Montana counties. For counties in which this insurance product is not offered, USDA's Farm Service Agency continues to offer the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. . . .
  • Rangeland Production Risk Management in Wyoming
    John P. Hewlett*, Gary Brester, and James B. Johnson,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  September 2005
        * University of Wyoming Extension Educator

    A new Group Risk Plan (GRP) Rangeland Insurance product is being offered by USDA's Risk Management Agency (RMA) in 10 Wyoming counties. For counties in which this insurance product is not offered, USDA's Farm Service Agency continues to offer the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. . . .
  • Insuring Success for Wyoming Agriculture 2005: Insurance & Risk Management Course
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, James B. Johnson, Montana State University Cooperative Extension, and Chris Bastian, University of Wyoming, March 2005.

    A six-hour CD and internet-based course covering insurance products and risk management alternatives available to Wyoming agricultural producers. The course is divided into 12 lessons discussing the sources of risk, strategic management, insurance available for the major crops in Wyoming, other risk management practices, and a risk self-assessment. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Safety-First: A RightRisk Lesson Guide
    Chris Bastian and John P. Hewlett, RightRisk School,  University of Wyoming, January 2004
    There are many different sources of risk, which can affect income and ultimately the survival of an agricultural operation. Management decisions about what to produce, how to handle potential problems, and when to take action can all have outcomes that turn out . . .
  • Production Risk Management
    Gary Brester, James B. Johnson and Vincent Smith, Presentation, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  January 2003
  • Price, Production, and Business Risk
    Gary Brester, James B. Johnson and Vincent Smith, Presentation, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  January 2003
  • Production Risk Management in Montana
    James B. Johnson, Annual Conference Presentation, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  March 2003
  • Spatial Basis Report
    Kevin McNew and Duane Griffith, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  June  2003
    This report provides an analysis of regional grain price in the U.S. for major grain commodities during May 2003. The basis, defined as the difference between a cash price and the price in the futures market, signifies the price for a specific commodity . . .
  • Impacts on U.S. Cattle Producers from Changes in Retail Beef Demand
    John M. Marsh, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February 2003
    Since the mid 1970s U.S. beef producers have faced persistent declines in the domestic demand for beef products. The consequences at the farm level have been reductions in real (inflation adjusted) cattle prices and cattle inventories. From 1976 to 2001, real  . . .
  • Japanese Import Demand for U.S. Beef and Pork
    John M. Marsh, Gary W. Brester and Dragon Miljkvoc, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February 2003
    The U.S. beef and port industries have become more dependent upon foreign markets as a source of increased red meat sales. Increases in per capita incomes in certain foreign countries, reduced trade barriers, preferences for animal-source proteins, and product  . . .
  • Harvested Roughage and Rangeland Production Risk Management in Montana-Crop Insurance
    James B. Johnson, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February 2003
    As drought continues in some areas of Montana, farm and ranch managers are increasingly seeking production risk management tools for forage seeding and harvested roughages such as forage and corn silage, rangeland.
  • Spatial Basis Report
    Kevin McNew and Duane Griffith, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February 2003
    This report provides an analysis of regional grain price in the U.S. for major grain commodities during January 2003. The basis, defined as the difference between a cash price and the price in the futures market, signifies the price for a specific commodity . . .
  • Technology Changes in the U.S. Beef and Pork Sectors
    John M. Marsh and Gary W. Brester, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  February 2003
    Substantial technological changes have occurred in the farm production and food processing sectors over the past several decades. Technological improvements in genetics, health and nutrition, capital equipment, processing methods, and products and services are examples . . .
  • Crop Insurance Alternatives for Hay in South Dakota
    Matthew A. Diersen, Extension Risk and Business Management Specialist, South Dakota State University 2002
    Crop insurance for hay is a relatively new idea in much of South Dakota. After a few years as a pilot program, federal forage crop insurance was offered statewide for the 2001 crop year. Producers, crop insurance agents , and regulatory agencies had a  . . .
  • Pasture and Grazing Land Price Information
    Matthew A. Diersen, Extension Risk and Business Management Specialist and Martin K. Beutler, Extension Economist, South Dakota State University 2003
    Pasture and grazing lands are a valuable resource with a price determined by productivity and market forces. Various sources of land price information are available; they are given here to improve your awareness of prices that are available, when prices are . . .
  • South Dakota Stocker Cattle Prices
    Matthew A. Diersen, Extension Risk and Business Management Specialist, South Dakota State University, 2003
    Producers are concerned about the general price level of stock cattle, weaned calves weighing about 500 pounds. Producers observe a wide range of reported prices for any given sale. Aggregating prices usually just compounds the problem as an even wider . . .
  • Fraud Prevention and Tools of the Trade - North Dakota
    Mark Price, Senior Investigator, Risk Management Agency Special Investigation Branch, a presentation at the Tenth Annual Crop Insurance Conference, Fargo, ND - January 20, 2003
  • What's New at RMA? - North Dakota
    Anne Jenkins, Acting Director of Risk Management Services, USDA-RMA, a presentation at the Tenth Annual Crop Insurance Conference, Fargo, ND - January 20, 2003
  • Insurance for the Minor Crops - North Dakota
    James B. Johnson, Professor and Extension Farm/Ranch Management Specialist, Montana State University, a presentation at the Tenth Annual Crop Insurance Conference, Fargo, ND - January 20, 2003
  • Crop Insurance Alternatives for Hay - North Dakota
    Matthew A. Diersen, Assist. Professor/Extension Risk Management Specialist, SDSU, a presentation at the Tenth Annual Crop Insurance Conference, Fargo, ND - January 20, 2003
  • (Crop Insurance) Product Availability - Montana
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Gary Brester, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Montana - PART III,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • Diversification Issues - Montana
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Gary Brester, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Montana - PART II,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • Production Risk - Montana
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Gary Brester, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Montana - PART I,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • Commodity Title of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 - Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Vince H. Smith, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Wyoming - PART IV,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • (Crop Insurance) Product Availability - Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Gary Brester, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Wyoming - PART III,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • Diversification Issues - Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Gary Brester, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Wyoming - PART II,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • Production Risk - Wyoming
    James B. Johnson, Kevin McNew, and Gary Brester, a presentation on Risk Management Education for Irrigated and Targeted Commodities in Wyoming - PART I,  Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2002
  • Ag Help Wanted: Guidelines for Managing Agricultural Labor
    Howard R. Rosenberg, Richard Carkner, John P. Hewlett, Lorne Owen, Trent Teegerstrom, Jeffrey E. Tranel, Randy R. Weigel, Western Farm Management Extension Committee, August 2002
    Ag Help Wanted is an educational guidebook designed to assist every person who currently manages or expects to manage human resources on farms, ranches, nurseries, dairies, and other agricultural operations.
  • Cattle Identification—The Canadian Experience
    James Unterschultz, University of Alberta and Darren Chase, Alberta Agriculture Food and Rural Development; 2002
    Canadian experience with new trace back requirements in the beef and dairy industry is just beginning. Canadian beef and dairy producers are implementing a national identification ear-tag program capable of tracing animals from the retail sector back to the original . . .
  • The Evolution of Identity Preservation in Red Meat Markets
    DeeVon Bailey, Utah State University and Demot Hayes, Iowa State University; 2002
    Agriculture is challenged by the fact that product from many producers is routinely co-mingled prior to sale. In this environment there is little incentive to innovate, or to differentiate and often a counter-incentive to improve quality.
  • Cattle Marketing and Food Safety
    Neal H. Hooker and Brian Roe, The Ohio State University; 2002
    Common sense suggests and statistical research confirms that lapses in the management of food safety along the cattle-beef supply chain create many negative consequences for society. Consumers are put at a higher risk of foodborne illness or other types of contamination . . .
  • Niche Marketing of Cattle/Beef
    Emmit Rawls, University of Tennessee, Lee Meyer and Kenny Burdine, University of Kentucky; 2002
    Niche marketing has been defined as servicing a unique market, or a unique portion of a common market, that is not already served. Some niche markets begin with an individual filling a personal desire that is not being met with existing products.
  • The New Beef Industry: What Will It Mean to Feeder Cattle Producers?
    Chris Bastian, University of Wyoming, 2002
    One can rarely pick up a livestock magazine or a cattle-related article without reading some reference to how the bee industry is changing. This of course is not a new message. We live in a  changing world, and the beef industry must continually change to meet the . . .
  • Prescriptions for a Healthy Beef Industry
    Wayne D. Purcell, Virginia Tech, 2002
    The title suggests that there have been problems in the beef sector or that it has somehow been "ill." Actually, that is the case. The data show that demand for beef decreased each year from 1980 through 1998. The reasons for that longstanding decline have been widely . . .
  • U.S. Beef Trade Issues
    Gary W. Brester and John M. Marsh, Montana State University, 2002
    Nominal U.S. cattle prices generally increased throughout the 1970s and 1980s but declined steadily throughout the 1990s. However, real fed and feeder cattle prices have declined steadily since 1979.
  • Structural Changes in Cattle Feeding and Meat Packing
    Clement E. Ward, Oklahoma State University and Ted C. Schroeder, Kansas State University, 2002
    Cattle feedlots and meatpacking plants have both declined in number and increased in size. However, in comparison, concentration has increased at a much more rapid pace in meatpacking than in cattle feeding.
  • Cattle Price Seasonality
    Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University and Steve Meyer, Livestock Marketing Information Center, 2002
    Seasonal price patterns are normal price movements or fluctuations that occur within a year. Recognizing the presence and magnitude of seasonal price patterns can improve many cattle producer marketing and production management decisions.
  • Focus on Beef Demand
    James Mintert, Ted Schroeder and Tom Marsh,  Kansas State University, 2002
    Consumer demand for beef increased modestly during 1999, 2000, and 2001, which generated considerable interest in the cattle industry.
  • The Impact of Corn and Fed Cattle Prices on Feeder Cattle Price Slides
    Kevin Dhuyvetter, Kansas State University; Ted Schroeder, Kansas State University; and Walt Prevatt, Auburn University; 2002
    Feeder cattle price determination and discovery are complex because many factors impact feed cattle markets. Feeder cattle are an input into a production process; therefore, feeder cattle demand is influenced by all the factors that affect future anticipated demand . . .
  • Price Determination versus Price Discovery
    Clement E. Ward and Ted C. Schroeder, Oklahoma State University, 2002
    This fact sheet distinguishes between Price Determination and Price Discovery, identifies how they are interrelated, and provides an indication when price discovery concerns may increase.
  • Industry Opportunities and Some issues for Value Based Marketing
    Russell Tronstad, University of Arizona and James Unterschultz, University of Alberta; 2002

    Grid pricing is commonly associated with value based marketing because each animal's price is based on individual quality and yield grades rather than group or pen averages.
  • Grid Base Prices and Premium-Discounts Over Time
    Clement E. Ward, Oklahoma State University; Ted C. Schroeder, Kansas State University; and Dillon M. Feuz, University of Nebraska; 2002
    The previous fact sheet (Understanding Grid Pricing) included an example of grid pricing and some of the implications from using grid pricing. The objective of this extension facts is to better distinguish formula pricing and grid pricing, discuss price discovery implications . . .
  • Understanding Grid Pricing
    Dillon M. Feuz, University of Nebraska; Clement E. Ward, Oklahoma State University; and Ted C. Schroeder, Kansas State University; 2002
    Recently there has been a much greater emphasis on improving the quality and consistency of beef. Cattle producers, breed associations, feed suppliers, and beef packers have all initiated value based pricing methods commonly referred to as grid pricing.
  • Alliances and Vertical Arrangements
    Clement E. Ward, Oklahoma State University, 2002
    Strategic alliances and various types of formal vertical arrangements have been of particular interest in the beef industry in recent years. Some believe these arrangements are the beef industry's answer to a long-term decline in beef demand, unclear price signals, and . . .
  • Basis Forward Contracts
    Clement E. Ward, Oklahoma State University and Stephen R. Koontz, Colorado State University; 2002
    Many cattle feeders are interested in pricing fed cattle with a basis forward contract and most packers will provide basis bids at feeders' requests. This extension fact sheet describes the forward contracting process and identifies advantages, disadvantages, and issues . . .
  • Factors Affecting the Basis for Feeder Cattle
    DeeVon Bailey, Utah State University; C. Wilson Gray, University of Idaho; and Emmit L. Rawls, University of Tennessee; 2002
    Basis is one of the most useful concepts in developing market strategies for agricultural commodity markets. Basis information is a critical part of forward pricing and spot market decisions and forecasting basis is an essential element when one is making these types . . .
  • Understanding and Using Feeder and Slaughter Cattle Basis
    James Mintert and Kevin Dhuyvetter, Kansas State University; Ernest E. Davis and Stan Bevers Texas A&M University; 2002
    Basis is defined as the difference between the local cash market and a futures contract price (Basis = Cash Price - Futures Price). Knowledge of historical basis patterns can be helpful when estimating expected sale or purchase prices at the conclusion of a futures . . .
  • Hedging Using Livestock Futures
    James D. Sartwelle, III, Texas A&M University and James Mintert, Kansas State University; 2002
    Livestock producers are sometimes faced with advantageous pricing opportunities prior to the time grain or livestock will be bought or sold in the cash market.
  • Retained Ownership of Cattle: Factors to Consider
    John M. Marsh Montana State University and  Dillon Feuz University of Nebraska, 2002
    Retained ownership (holding cattle longer than would “normally” be the case) is one action some producers take in response to low prices at the time they would normally sell their cattle (calves).
  • Weather Related Sales of Livestock and Tax Implications
    Russell Tronstad, University of Arizona; C. Wilson Gray, University of Idaho; and Lee Meyer, University of Kentucky; 2002
    Special tax treatment is generally available to producers that are forced to sell animals due to weather related events like drought and flooding.
  • Leasing Arrangements For Cattle
    Richard T. Clark, University of Nebraska; Duane Griffith, Montana State University; Kevin Dhuyvetter, Kansas State University; and Damona Doye, Oklahoma State University; 2002
    Agriculturalists have long used leasing arrangements as a means of farming or ranching with more than owned resources.
  • Taking Your Beef Cow Herd Profitably Through the Cattle Cycle
    Harlan Hughes, North Dakota State University; Lee Meyer, University of Kentucky; Tim Cross, University of Tennessee; and Dwight Aakre, North Dakota State University; 2002
    The key to surviving the cattle inventory cycle, and its resulting price cycle (cattle and beef), is to first increase the economic efficiency of your beef cowherd during the good times.
  • Benchmarking Your Herd's Economic Facts
    Harlan Hughes and Dwight Aakre, North Dakota State University, 2002

    Benchmarking is the process of conducting a comparative analysis of your beef cow profit center with the averages of a set of benchmark herds and is the single most powerful farm and ranch management tool available.
  • Men Seeking Help
    Randy R. Weigel, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, June 2002
    When this question was raised at a recent stress management workshop, an immediate response was "They don't, and they won't." But it's not that simple. Although there are many ranch and farm men who seek help when facing personal challenges, there are also . . .
  • Surviving Tragedy
    Randy R. Weigel, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, June 2002
    Losing a limb, death, divorce, or losing the farm or ranch shapes the lives of ranchers and farmers in long and lasting ways. Much of the study of people's adaptation to traumatic events focuses on pain and suffering.

 

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