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  • 2016 Western Extension Committee Ag Industry Survey
    John P. Hewlett, K. Fuller, S. Nakamoto, S. Neibergs, K. Painter, C. Seavert, D. Thilmany, H. Tejeda, J. Warner, S. Noray, and members of the Western Extension Committee who helped solicit input and circulate to clientele in the 13 western states, July, 2016.

    In early 2016, the idea for the Agricultural Industry Survey originated from a similar effort administered by a group of Colorado Extension Specialists. Members of the Western Extension Committees (WEC) on Farm Management and Marketing, made up of Extension economists from 13 Western States, Guam, and the U.S. Pacific Islands then initiated a survey specific to agriculture in the west. The survey invitation was emailed to the WEC membership who distributed it through Extension contact channels.
  • A Case Farm: Profit Farms
    Gayle Willett, Washington State University Cooperative Extension Service, December 1998

    Profit Farms is a 1,500-acre dryland grain operation located in the Pacific Northwest. The farm is operated by Max and Marlene Profit. The Profits are both 45 years old, have been married 24 years, and have three children--two sons, ages 22 and 15, . . .
  • A New Look At the Agricultural Community As Extension Clientele in the West from Rural Family Ventures
    A survey of demographics, threats, educational preferences, and resources managed by agricultural producers in Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming having annual sales of less than $50,000

    Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Randolph Weigel,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Tauhidur Rahman,  University of Arizona, Trent Teegerstrom,  University of Arizona,  Cole Ehmke,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, April 2007.
    There are 48,085 farmers and ranchers in the states of Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming. Significant increases in the number of small farms have occurred from 1992 to 1997 to 2002. Farms reporting less than 180 acres account for almost 55 percent of all farms. Likewise, farms with sales of less than $50,000 account for fully 78 percent of all farms across the three states. (NASS 1992, 1997, 2002)  This project report seeks to identify Extension clientele and provide researchers with a greater understanding of clientele demographics, education methodology preferences, and perceived risks. More information available at: RuralFamilyVentures.org
  • AG IN UNCERTAIN TIMES: helping producers and others meet the challenge…
    Duane Griffith, John P. Hewlett, Ramiro Lobo, Trent Teegerstrom, Jeffrey Tranel, John Nelson, and Jon Newkirk representing the Cooperative Extension Service in Montana, Wyoming, California, Arizona, Colorado and Washington,  June 2009.

    Ag In Uncertain Times web pages are designed to provide current information to farmers, ranchers and educators about the challenges in today’s agricultural economy. The webinars and tools found there are some of the best currently available. Included are: 1) Schedule- a listing of live webinars open to the general public on a variety of topics. 2) Speakers- a listing of speakers presenting in our webinars and 3) Webinars- access to recordings of live events listed on the Schedule. These pages also offer the opportunity to engage others in discussion about the topics covered.
  • An Introduction to Risk in Agriculture
    Dennis A. Kaan, Cooperative Extension Service Colorado State University, December 1999
    The business environment agricultural producers operate in today is vastly different from the environment that existed prior to the Federal Agricultural Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (FAIR Act). The responsibility to manage risk has been placed with . . .
  • Building a Risk Management Plan
    Risk Management Agency, United States Department of Agriculture, August 1998
    This unique publication includes a listing of crop insurance companies and phone numbers, producer information sources (both print and electronic), and quizzes to test your financial strength and management skills. Its comprehensive articles, meant to help growers start . . .
  • Defining Risk and a Framework for Moving Towards Resilience in Agriculture
    Dennis A. Kaan, Cooperative Extension Service Colorado State University, December 1999
    Farmers and ranchers make decisions in a risky environment every day.  The consequences of their decisions are generally not known when the decisions are made.  The two situations that most concern agriculture producers are: 1) is there a high probability of adverse . . .
  • Developing a Risk Management Plan
    Paul Patterson and Larry Makus, University of Idaho Cooperative Extension Service, December 1998

    This presentation provides an overview to the topic of developing a risk management plan. The focus is on how risk management should be integrated into the overall planning process.
  • Developing a Sensible and Successful Marketing Attitude
    Suzanne Karberg, Cooperative Extension Service Purdue University, April 1993

    A first step in increasing your marketing skills is to develop a sensible and successful attitude toward marketing. If you are an experienced farmer, you know how good it feels to be able to successfully raise a commodity.
  • Establishing and Reaching Goals
    Suzanne Karberg, Cooperative Extension Service Purdue University, April 1993
    Open communication and an effort to compromise will prevent and resolve conflicts that otherwise could disrupt the farm's progress. Remember that goals must be well-defined and realistic. They must be consistent with the overall philosophy of farm management and . . .
  • Farming Without a Safety Net
    George Flaskerud, North Dakota State University Extension Service, June 1996
    Producers must learn how to manage risk by responding properly to production, marketing and financial risks. A good risk management strategy will make use of all applicable responses to risk.
  • Feasibility of Alternative Rural Enterprises course from RightRiskTM
    Rodney Sharp, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, and Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, Sept. 2006.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering 1) Agricultural and Rural Enterprises, 2) Selecting and Planning for Alternative Enterprise, and 3) Assessing Risks. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • From Risk to Resilience in Agriculture: An Action Plan
    Chris Bastian, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service and Dennis A. Kaan, Cooperative Extension Service Colorado State University, December 1999
    Risk management involves choosing among alternatives that can reduce risk within the operation, transfer risk outside the operation or increase the operation’s ability to bear risk.  Selecting the best alternative for your operation begins with planning.  This article gives  . . .
  • Managing for Today's Cattle Market and Beyond
    Western Marketing Committee and other collaborators, August 1996
    A well-planned collection of 36 outstanding papers, produced by 29 authors from 16 states. The project was conceived by the Western Extension Marketing Committee for extension and classroom audiences.
  • Managing for the Millennium
    Clark A Roberts, University of Illinois, August 1998
    A general risk education presentation for PowerPointŪ 97.
  • Managing Risk in Agriculture
    George F. Patrick, Cooperative Extension Service Purdue University, May 1992
    Decision making involves setting your goals and objectives, identifying the problem, determining your alternatives, evaluating these alternatives, selecting an alternative, implementing that alternative, and bearing responsibility for the outcome.
  • Profiling the Evolving Characteristics and Needs for Risk Management Education of Commercial Agricultural Producers in the Intermountain West from Rural Family Ventures
    A survey of demographics, threats, educational preferences, and resources managed by agricultural producers reporting annual sales greater than $50,000 across Wyoming, Colorado, and Arizona

    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Cole Ehmke,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, Tauhidur Rahman,  University of Arizona, Trent Teegerstrom,  University of Arizona, Jeffrey E. Tranel, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension, Randolph Weigel,  University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, August 2010.
    There are 63,760 farmers and ranchers in the states of Wyoming, Colorado, and Arizona. Significant changes in the number of farms have occurred from 1997 to 2002 to 2007. Farms reporting more than 180 acres account for only 35 percent of all farms (down from 45 percent). Likewise, farms with sales of greater than $50,000 account for only 18 percent of all farms across the three states. (NASS 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007)  This project seeks to better -understand Extension clientele and provide researchers with greater insight into clientele demographics, education methodology preferences, and perceived risks.  More information available at: RuralFamilyVentures.org
  • Resource Inventory course from Enterprising Rural Families: Making it WorkTM
    Randolph R. Weigel, John P. Hewlett, and William R. Taylor, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, July 2007.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering strategic management and goal setting for families in business across two modules and 5 lessons. Other materials include: twenty-two system inventories, eight readings to embellish course material, and thirteen interactive components and exercises to enhance participant learning. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Risk and Resilience in Agriculture
    Colorado State University, University of Wyoming and Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service specialists collaborating on a USDA-Risk Management Agency funded project, December 1999
    Risk and Resilience in Agriculture--a series of 34 articles designed with the purpose of helping agricultural producers develop individual and family strategies to best deal with today’s agricultural business environment.
  • Risk Scenairo Planning Course: Evaluating Risk and Risk Management Strategies from RightRiskTM
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension; Jay Parsons, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and William Taylor, University of Wyoming Extension, emeritus; September 2016.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering: Introduction to Risk, Risk Strategies, Case Studies: Gates Creek Land & Livestock, Case Studies: Case Studies: Big Country Farms, Case Studies: Bell Livestock, Case Studies: Z-F Ranch, Risk Scenairo Planning Tool Overview, Expectations About the Future, Risk Management Framework, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Safety-First: A RightRisk Lesson Guide
    Chris Bastian and John P. Hewlett, RightRisk School,  University of Wyoming, January, 2004
    There are many different sources of risk, which can affect income and ultimately the survival of an agricultural operation. Management decisions about what to produce, how to handle potential problems, and when to take action can all have outcomes that turn out . . .
  • Strategic Planning and Goal Setting course from Enterprising Rural Families: Making it WorkTM
    William R. Taylor, John P. Hewlett, and Randolph R. Weigel, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension, July 2007.

    A two-hour CD and internet-based course covering strategic management and goal setting for families in business across two modules and 9 lessons. Other materials include: scenarios of two example families in business to illustrate various aspects of the course content, four worksheets and assessments, seven readings to expand on course material, and twenty-two interactive components and exercises to enhance participant learning. Also included are a glossary, resource links for further research, and many other features.
  • Strategic Planning for Risk Management
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service, December 1999
    Changing federal, state, and other regulations, coupled with new production technologies, improved communication methods, and more abundant information combine to lead many mangers to ask ”How do I even start to get a handle on it all?”. This paper provides a . . .
  • Strategic Risk Management
    John P. Hewlett, University of Wyoming
    Managing a farm or ranch in today's world is not easy. Changing federal, state, and other regulations pull the manager first one way, then another. In addition, development of world markets...
        Farmer-Stockman, Nov. 1998
  • The PNW Risk Management Education Project - Introduction
    Oregon
    State University, Washington State University and University of Idaho Cooperative Extension Service specialists collaborating on a USDA-Risk Management Agency funded project, December 1998
    The Pacific Northwest Risk Management Education Project is a three state effort among Idaho, Oregon, and Washington with the goal of improving the survivability and profitability of wheat producers by helping them improve and apply their risk management skills. The primary focus has been on cereal grain producers; however, many of the materials are applicable to producers of other commodities as well.
  • Testing Your Risk Management Knowledge
    Dennis A. Kaan, Cooperative Extension Service Colorado State University, December 1999
    Risk Management is a relatively new term for agricultural producers but not a new concept.  Risk has always been a part of farming and ranching and so has skilled management.  What has been lacking is the use of these two words synonymously.
  • Using a MBM Risk Calculator
    Matthew A. Diersen, Briefing Paper, Agricultural Marketing Policy Center, Montana State University Cooperative Extension Service,  November, 2001

 

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